Faculty News

Sir William Luce Fellowship

Sir William Luce Fellowship

Durham University

The Sir William Luce Memorial Fund welcomes applications for the position of Sir William Luce Fellow which will commence in April 2017.

The Sir William Luce Memorial Fund was established to commemorate the long and distinguished career of Sir William Luce GBE, KCMG, DL (1907-77) in the Middle East during the era of the transfer of power.

The Fellowship is awarded annually to a scholar at post-doctoral level, diplomat, politician, or business executive, working on those parts of the Middle East to which Sir William Luce devoted his working life (Iran, the Gulf states, South Arabia and Sudan), and is hosted by Durham University during Easter term (24 April – 23 June 2017). The Fund may give some preference to proposals linked to the University’s Sudan Archive. The Fellowship, tenable jointly in the Institute for Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies and Trevelyan College, will entitle the holder to full access to departmental and other University facilities such as the University Library, including the Sudan Archive, and Computing and Information Services. It also carries a grant, accommodation and all meals for the duration of the Fellowship. The Fellow is expected to deliver a lecture on the subject of his or her research which will be designated ‘/The Sir William Luce Lecture’/, and should be cast in such a way as to form the basis of a paper to be published in a special edition of the Durham Middle East Papers series.

Applicants should send a CV, an outline of their proposed research and contact details for two referees, preferably by e-mail, by Thursday, October 6th to:

The Secretary
Sir William Luce Memorial Fund
Durham University Library
Palace Green
Durham DH1 3RN
United Kingdom
E-mail: luce.fund@durham.ac.uk

For further information about the Luce Fund, please click here.

3/3/16: Modern Islamophobia: Muslims in Europe and the U.S.

Mehnaz Afridi
Mehnaz Afridi, Assistant Professor of Religion, Manhattan College

UConn and the Jewish Federation Association of Connecticut invite you to a community conversation featuring:

Dr. Mehnaz M. Afridi

When: Thursday, March 3, 2016 from 3 – 5 pm
Where: UConn School of Social Work, Zachs Community Room
1798 Asylum Avenue, West Hartford

Light refreshments will be served.

The event is free, but RSVP is required: SSWEvents@uconn.edu

Dr. Mehnaz M. Afridi is an assistant professor of religion at Manhattan College, she teaches courses about Islam and the Holocaust, and is director of the college’s Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center. Dr. Afridi is a Pakistani-born Muslim who devotes her energies to documenting the Nazi decimation of European Jewry and how it relates to other faiths, especially her own. She is a member of the ethics and religion committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, and her first book Shoah Through Muslim Eyes was published in December 2015 (Academic Studies Press).

For more on Dr. Alfridi’s journey, hear her tell her story in this video.

Sponsored by UConn Global AffairsJFactUConn School of Social Work.

Generous funding provided by the UConn Zachs Fund for Holocaust Education. 

3/12 – 3/14/16: International Conference on Cross Cultural Encounters (ICCCE 2016)

12-14 March, 2016, in Cairo, Egypt

Under the patronage of: English Language & Literature Department, Faculty of Arts, Alexnadria University, Egypt

Important Dates
Submission: 15 January, 2016 (possible extension)
Notification: Within 4 weeks
Camera Ready: 01 March, 2016
Registration: 01 Feb, 2016

Venue: Intercontinental CityStars Hotel

We seek novel paper submissions to be presented or posted (as a poster paper) in ICCCE’2016 with topics broadly including, but not limited to (themes sorted alphabetically):

  •  Coercion and exploitation
  •  Comparative analyses of humanitarian responses
  •  Comparative imagology and representations of the Other in literature, film, song and other media
  •  Cultural identity
  •  Cultures and Sub-cultures
  •  Empire, contact and mobility
  •  English-language translations of literature
  •  Family, children, and migrant mobility
  •  Fiction, film, or nonfictional texts in the study of cross-cultures
  •  Gender identity
  •  Gender, migration, and cross-cultural encounters
  •  History and present of mass mobility
  •  Human rights rhetoric
  •  Identity and Critical theory
  •  Identity and Identifications: theory and methodology
  •  Identity and Memory
  •  Identity and Nationalism
  •  Influences on music, literature or popular culture
  •  Issues of immigration and emigration
  •  Labour, migration and cross-cultural encounters
  •  Literary presentations of culture, politics or literature
  •  Literature and Empowerment
  •  Literature: Space for the Marginalized
  •  Media and Identity
  •  Metaphors of crisis and disaster
  •  Migration, borders, and border securitization
  •  Migration, health, and disability
  •  Minorities and Literature
  •  National and regional governmental responses
  •  Nationality, citizenship, statelessness, documentation, and identity
  •  Public Responses to human mobility
  •  Race, ethnicity and citizenship
  •  Role of imagery, media, social media of mobility and crisis
  •  Role of NGOs and other non-state agents in migration management
  •  Teaching Literature to the Underprivileged
  •  The arts, literature and Identity
  •  The Margin and the Canon
  •  The Margin vs. the Mainstream
  •  The Margin: Negotiating Spaces
  •  The Margin: Spaces within Spaces
  •  The Marginalized in Translation
  •  Ties between literary and political relations in cross-cultures
  •  Voices of the Marginalized
  •  War, migration and cross-cultural contact

Humanities, Cultural Studies, Study of the Language, Poetic Studies, and Literary representation studies are welcomed.
Submission could be in the form of:
1- Abstract (paper not exceeding 300-400 words)
2- Full papers: Prepare your manuscript (maximum 15 pages)
3- Film/Media (needs abstract submission)

Presentation Type: Paper, Abstract. The actual presentation should not exceed 20 minutes, but there is no word limit on the paper to be published.

Submission link : http://edas.info/N21773

Reviewing Process: Each submitted paper will be blindly reviewed by at least two members of an international program committee with appropriate expertise.

31st Annual Middle East History and Theory Conference: THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

19524-580x481May 6–7, 2016

We invite graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars from a broad range of disciplines to submit proposals on any topic concerning the Middle East and Islamic world from the advent of Islam to the present day. Disciplinary focuses include but are not limited to: history, sociology, anthropology, political science, economics, literature, philosophy, art history, cinema and media studies, gender studies, and diaspora studies. If you are unsure about the suitability of your topic, feel free to email us (see address below). Approximately 50 papers will be selected and arranged into themed panels of three or four.

Individual submissions and preformed panels are both welcome, though the latter is especially encouraged. Participants should be prepared to deliver a maximum twenty-minute presentation and respond to questions or comments from an assigned discussant. Written papers should be circulated to panel members at least two weeks before the conference.

Application. Please send submissions electronically to mehat.conference@uchicago.edu by no later than Friday, February 12, 2016. Please include each presenter’s name, institution, and position (graduate student, professor, independent scholar, etc.), and attach a 250-word abstract with a tentative title. The best abstracts will summarize the paper’s topic, its relationship and contribution to existing scholarship and specific conclusions. Abstracts will be collated by an assistant and evaluated anonymously by the coordinators; therefore, please do not include names or any identifying information in the abstract. Selection results will be announced in the middle of March 2016.

Sponsored panels. As in previous years, two of our sponsors are offering limited funding to support special panels in the following fields: (1) modern Arabic literature and (2) Central Eurasian studies. Participants chosen for one of these panels may be eligible for a modest travel subsidy. Those interested should submit their abstracts according to the process outlined above, with a note indicating their interest in being a part of one of these sponsored panels. Applicants not placed on a special panel will still receive full consideration for the general conference. Please circulate widely. Updates and announcements will be shared on the MEHAT website and Facebook page.

For all inquiries, please write to mehat.conference@uchicago.edu.

Conference Coordinators:

Mariam Sheibani PhD Student, NELC University of Chicago

Amir Toft PhD Student, NELC University of Chicago

11/12/15: The Syrian Refugee Emergency: Humanitarian and Human Rights Perspectives

syrian_refugee
A pile of children shoes captured during refugees crisis. Refugee crisis. Budapest, Hungary, Central Europe, 6 September 2015.

Hear from:

Dr. Zaid Eyadat
Political Science and Human Rights Institute
University of Connecticut

Dr. Jeff Crisp
Refugee Studies Center
University of Oxford

Dr. M. Anne Sa’adeh
Joel Parker Professor of Law and Political Science
Dartmouth College

When: Thurs., November 12th at 7pm
Where: Konover Auditorium Dodd Center

Co-sponsored by Middle East Studies, UConn Global, Global House, and the Human Rights Institute.

10/22/15: Arab-Jewish Coexistence Panel

Beit Hagefen at UConn eventHear from Arab and Jewish teens about coexistence in Israel

Date:  Thursday, October 22nd
Time: 5:00pm
Location:  Castleman Building, Room 212

Guest speakers from Beit Hagefen Center in Haifa, Israel:

– Mr. Asaf Ron, CEO
– Ella Chernyak, high school student
– May Ayoub, high school student

Beit Hagefen is an Arab-Jewish cultural center “which strives for the creation of common and equal spaces that encompass the variety of identities and cultures in Haifa in particular and in Israel in general.”

Ella, a 17-year-old Russian Jew, and May, a 16-year-old Christian Arab, will share their stories with us in order to prove that coexistence is possible and actually exists in Israel.

For more information on Beit Hagefen, visit: here

October 28-29: “Reinventing Israel” conference at American University

American University logo

“Reinventing Israel: Transformations of Israeli Society in the 21st Century”

American University,
Washington, DC
October 28-29, 2015

Travel Subsidies for Junior Faculty Available

RSVP FOR SESSIONS:

Scholars are invited to attend “Reinventing Israel: Transformations of Israeli Society in the 21st Century,” an international academic conference on October 28-29, 2015 at American University in Washington, DC. The conference is sponsored by American University’s Center for Israel Studies and Jewish Studies Program. A limited number of travel subsidies are available for junior faculty and advanced graduate students. Applications for travel subsidies are due September 25, 2015. Notifications will be made on a rolling basis by October 1, 2015.

Conference Chairs:

Michael Brenner, Seymour and Lillian Abensohn Chair in Israel Studies, American University and Chair of Jewish History and Culture, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich
Pamela Nadell, Patrick Clendenen Chair in Women’s and Gender Studies, American University

Conference Summary:
The 1967 Six-Day War, with its resulting control of significant new territory, compelled profound changes in Israel’s self-definition. Demographically, Israel’s society has become more religious. Politically, it has gradually moved to the right. The transformation of Israeli society has been ongoing ever since.

This conference will examine the more recent aspects of the transformation of Israeli society in the 21st century, including the birth of the start-up nation and the growing economic inequality, changes in Holocaust memory and in Israel-diaspora relations. Scholars from the United States and Israel will present new insights in the fields of politics, law, economy, art, and literature. They turn our attention to the immigrants from unexpected destinations like Nigeria and Burma, who claim to derive from “the lost tribes,” as well as to the growing Israeli diaspora in America and Europe, and to the changing self-definition of Israeli Arabs who regard themselves increasingly as Palestinians. A concluding panel addresses the question of how Israel will look twenty years from now.

Link to application, with program:

Questions: American University Center for Israel Studies, israelstudies@american.edu, 202-885-3780